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Boxing medal hopes extinguished

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MASERU – Lesotho’s hopes for boxing silverware at the 2022 Commonwealth Games in Birmingham, England are over after the country’s boxers all failed to get past the round of 16 stage.

The losses extended Lesotho’s medal drought for another four years with the country’s last boxing success at the Games coming in 2006 when Moses Kopo won silver at the Melbourne edition in Australia.

As usual, the root of Lesotho’s problems was poor preparation which led to the downfall of Retšelisitsoe Kolobe, Moroke Mokhotho, Qhobosheane Mohlerepe, Phomolo Lengola and Arena Pakela as each suffered heartache one step before the quarterfinals.

Speaking to thepost yesterday, the Lesotho Boxing Association’s (LEBA) spokesperson, Rethabile Mohale, said the team’s preparations were so bad that even meeting for training was a challenge.

Associations and athletes have always been clear about what needs to be done for them to be ready for major international competitions like the Commonwealth Games, but the government sinks to new lows every year.

Even after arriving in England, athletes were complaining privately that their needs were not being met.

Lengola, who fights in the 51-54kg weight category, was the last Lesotho boxer to fight and he lost 4-1 on points to Owain Harris-Allan from Wales on Tuesday.

On the same day, Pakela was also eliminated in the round of 16 as he lost 5-0 on points to Aidan Walsh of Northern Ireland in the light middleweight category (67-71kg).

Pakela started the competition in the first round where he defeated Isaac Zebra of Uganda 4-1 on points, but his joy was short-lived.

Despite their heartbreak, Mohale commended the boxers for their performances in the face of the challenges they faced.

“The performance was good even though we are out of the Commonwealth Games as boxing Lesotho,” Mohale said. “We cannot hide behind what didn’t happen, we have to say what the performance was. We used the public’s funds and we are coming back with nothing, but what is important is what people on top did to make sure we trained the same as those we were fighting against,” he said.

The fighters could have done much better with better preparations, Mohale was clearly saying.

“To just go to training and meet as the team was a big problem (and our) camp happened late,” he said.

“Our preparation was bad, if you look at their first fights, they won, but in the second fights they lost but they were competing. We were lacking strong preparations.”

Mohale was also not happy with the refereeing which he felt was unfair in two fights.

 

One involved Lesotho’s 2016 Olympian, Moroke Mokhotho, who lost on Referee Stops Contest (RSC) when he was on points on the scorecard.
Earlier this year Mokhotho who fights in the 54-57kg weight category, announced he would be retiring from international competitions after the Commonwealth Games to focus on development of young boxers and his failure was perhaps the biggest disappointment.

The other two boxers who failed to go beyond the round of 16 are Qhobosheane Mohlerepe and Retšelisitsoe Kolobe who lost to Canada’s Wyatt Sanford and Jake Todd from Wales respectively.

Mohlerepe, who fights in the 60-63.5kg weight category, had won his preliminary fight against Atmatzidis Odysseas from Cyprus.
Kolobe, like Mokhotho, lost his bout on RSC.

A lot of Lesotho’s athletes at the Commonwealth Games complained about poor preparations prior to leaving for Birmingham with some saying they had not been to tournaments in months and

had only trained locally against their counterparts.
Even after arriving in England, athletes were still crying that they were lacking things they needed to compete properly.

In other events at the Games, Mokulubete Makatisi clocked a personal best of 2:36:05 hours and finished eighth in the women’s marathon.
Finishing in the top 10 has been described as a good performance Makatisi can build on ahead of the Paris 2024 Olympics.

On Tuesday, Mojela Koneshe was unfortunate not to proceed to the semi-finals of the men’s 100 metres when he finished fourth clocking 10.46 seconds in his race. Koneshe was racing against seasoned sprinters including South Africa’s Akani Simbine. In the 800 metres, ‘Manqabang Tsibela finished sixth clocking 2:13.34 but it was not enough for her to proceed to the next round.

In the men’s marathon, Lebenya Nkoka and Tšepo Mathibelle clocked season’s best times as they finished 15th in 2:32:52, and 17th in 2:38:52 respectively. Motlokoa Nkhabutlane did not finish the race.

Tlalane Phahla

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